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Help for Isolated Teens: Memes and More

help for isolated teens

Help for Isolated Teens: Memes and More

Suicide is the second leading cause of death for youth. The subject is not something that is hushed from social media. Suicide memes are becoming more popular on social media. While the intention of these memes has been questioned, it is thought that they are used as a method for individuals to “bond” over being suicidal. Experts believe that the new social media trend could open the window for opportunity and reach an important and vulnerable audience- socially isolated young people.

How Memes are Helping

Here are multiple ways in which memes are part of the movement to help increase awareness and conversation around suicide in teens:

  1. Memes are a way for teens to discuss suicide in their own language. If you look at the threads associated with memes, people express that they are helpful.
  2. This type of communication is a way for individuals to anonymously communicate in an artistic, clever, and relatable way.
  3. The messages memes bring can help individuals learn they are not alone and encourage them to seek help.
  4. Talking about the issues we struggle with is the first step towards recovery.

What You Can Do

It is important to listen to your child and notice changes in their normal behaviors. Depression appears differently in all teens. If your child suddenly isolates themselves from social situations or seems uninterested in their normal activities, you should not ignore this. Here are some ways you can help address your concerns with your teen:

  • Be loving. You have to come at the subject from a caring and loving angle. This will help your teen feel accepted and validated in their feelings.
  • Prioritize the positive. Interacting with your teen in a positive way is critical. It is easy to get angry when your teen’s behavior gets out of control. However, being overly reactive will only create more conflict in the relationship. You should prioritize keeping a healthy relationship with your teen so that they feel safe and comfortable seeking your help.
  • Keep tabs on them. This is always a scary thing for parents. You don’t want your teen to think you smother them, but you don’t want to be a ghost parent either because you’re genuinely concerned. It is never a bad idea to check in with your teen throughout the day to make sure they are safe and okay. It shows you care and can help you feel a peace of mind knowing they are okay.
  • Talk openly. Nothing can ever be solved when you don’t talk about it. If you suspect your teen may be having suicidal thoughts. Address it in a non-accusatory way. Communication is key to getting your teen the help they need.

ViewPoint Center can help

ViewPoint Center is a specialty hospital for teens who struggle with mental health disorders. ViewPoint Center a comprehensive therapeutic assessment facility that is licensed and provides 24-hour nursing. Viewpoint offers comprehensive assessments. Post evaluation, treatment plans are established to meet the unique needs of each student. By the end of the treatment period at ViewPoint, families have a clear understanding of the child’s diagnoses and are offered full guidance on how to move forward and seek proper treatment. ViewPoint Center is dedicated to helping students and their families seek the treatment and care they need to lead happy and healthy lives. We can help your family today!

Contact us at 855-290-9682